Comments for Blog http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog Sat, 30 May 2015 18:43:27 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.2.1 Comment on Why do antidepressants take so long to work? by Adrian Cox http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2012/03/why-do-antidepressants-take-so-long-to-work/#comment-1312 Adrian Cox Sat, 30 May 2015 18:43:27 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=66#comment-1312 "The apparently positive effects of antidepressants on depression are even smaller than previously thought and "fall far short" of clinical significance, according to a new analysis of the trial data published in Contemporary Clinical Trials. The study was conducted by Irving Kirsch, author of The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth, and MIA Blogger Joanna Moncrieff" (http://www.madinamerica.com/2015/05/reanalysis-of-data-shows-antidepressant-impacts-on-depression-not-clinically-significant/) Unfortunately - and for some, tragically - according to the source quoted not only are antidepressants slow to act, they never do much effect at all. However, typically, I understand, depression remits spontaneously within six months of onset. “The apparently positive effects of antidepressants on depression are even smaller than previously thought and “fall far short” of clinical significance, according to a new analysis of the trial data published in Contemporary Clinical Trials. The study was conducted by Irving Kirsch, author of The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth, and MIA Blogger Joanna Moncrieff” (http://www.madinamerica.com/2015/05/reanalysis-of-data-shows-antidepressant-impacts-on-depression-not-clinically-significant/)

Unfortunately – and for some, tragically – according to the source quoted not only are antidepressants slow to act, they never do much effect at all.

However, typically, I understand, depression remits spontaneously within six months of onset.

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Comment on “I didn’t cause it; I can’t control it; I can’t cure it” by missd http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2013/05/%e2%80%9ci-didn%e2%80%99t-cause-it-i-can%e2%80%99t-control-it-i-can%e2%80%99t-cure-it%e2%80%9d/#comment-1187 missd Fri, 10 Apr 2015 23:13:20 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=292#comment-1187 This episode really got me as having a son who is addicted to legal highs and the struggles that go with it...I would love to know how benedict is doing now. This episode really got me as having a son who is addicted to legal highs and the struggles that go with it…I would love to know how benedict is doing now.

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Comment on Why do antidepressants take so long to work? by anonymous http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2012/03/why-do-antidepressants-take-so-long-to-work/#comment-1104 anonymous Thu, 12 Feb 2015 17:25:29 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=66#comment-1104 The half lives of SSRI's have been shown to be about 24 hours or so, therefore the pharmacokinetics would suggest you should reach steady state within a week The half lives of SSRI’s have been shown to be about 24 hours or so, therefore the pharmacokinetics would suggest you should reach steady state within a week

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Comment on A New Letter by Ashley http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2014/09/a-new-letter/#comment-983 Ashley Mon, 08 Sep 2014 00:57:58 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=438#comment-983 For anyone who is interested in reading more of my reflections on mental health, I blog on a regular basis at http://resonantbreath.wordpress.com. For anyone who is interested in reading more of my reflections on mental health, I blog on a regular basis at http://resonantbreath.wordpress.com.

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Comment on Mental Health Awareness Week: Anxiety by Edward J Cejka http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2014/05/mental-health-awareness-week-anxiety/#comment-980 Edward J Cejka Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:00:21 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=416#comment-980 Mental Health Awareness is largely down to the generous support we receive from organisations and individuals throughout the UK who get involved by publicising the week, organising activities and events, and hopefully having some fun as well. Mental Health Awareness is largely down to the generous support we receive from organisations and individuals throughout the UK who get involved by publicising the week, organising activities and events, and hopefully having some fun as well.

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Comment on Care in the Community rescues patients from confinement by Mindful http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2013/11/bedlam-ep3-psychosis/#comment-976 Mindful Tue, 08 Jul 2014 18:09:26 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=346#comment-976 Any inaccuracies aside, I thought this was a very good overview of the programme and shows how care in the community has evolved over time and how people with mental health problems can recover with help and support and live fulfilling lives in the community. Any inaccuracies aside, I thought this was a very good overview of the programme and shows how care in the community has evolved over time and how people with mental health problems can recover with help and support and live fulfilling lives in the community.

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Comment on Care in the Community rescues patients from confinement by Kes_Smith http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2013/11/bedlam-ep3-psychosis/#comment-974 Kes_Smith Wed, 18 Jun 2014 22:18:32 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=346#comment-974 Tamara was certainly having delusions, but they were not "totally unreal". She DID have bedbugs in her flat. At no point did it say during the programme that Tamara had been refusing to take her medication. It said this of Rosemary. Tamara also at no time refused the mental healthcare workers entry to her house - that again was Rosemary. Ray did not have mental health problems. His son, Lloyd, had schizophrenia. Jim wasn't seen talking to Lloyd at any time, suggesting that Lloyd wasn't one of Jim's clients. Also, Lloyd did not "disappear from his flat". He was rushed into ICU with pancreatitis. Aside from all these inaccuracies, this is an incredibly stigmatising article that makes it sound like psychiatric service users are children who need to be controlled and looked after. Tamara was certainly having delusions, but they were not “totally unreal”. She DID have bedbugs in her flat.

At no point did it say during the programme that Tamara had been refusing to take her medication. It said this of Rosemary. Tamara also at no time refused the mental healthcare workers entry to her house – that again was Rosemary.

Ray did not have mental health problems. His son, Lloyd, had schizophrenia. Jim wasn’t seen talking to Lloyd at any time, suggesting that Lloyd wasn’t one of Jim’s clients. Also, Lloyd did not “disappear from his flat”. He was rushed into ICU with pancreatitis.

Aside from all these inaccuracies, this is an incredibly stigmatising article that makes it sound like psychiatric service users are children who need to be controlled and looked after.

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Comment on “We might be making 50-100 important decisions a week and they affect people’s liberty, they affect people’s safety, they affect public safety.” by SD http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2013/11/bedlam-crisis/#comment-949 SD Tue, 12 Nov 2013 08:55:48 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=327#comment-949 An insightful and thought provoking blog - complementing what we saw in Bedlam last week. Bedlam showed very well the day to day reality of being on an acute psych ward - in my own experience a less than therapeutic environment. \"And ultimately, what I always say is, if you really want to kill yourself, you will kill yourself”. There’s no doubt that Dr Baggaley would not take a decision to discharge a patient lightly and that the decision-making process itself, is not straightforward, but I can’t help but consider the apparent contradiction of the statement. I don\'t know how many times I have had the \'if you really want to kill yourself ..\' statement said to me. Yes it does contradict everything that goes behind the so called duty of care. I see other patients sectioned for their own safety and yet this is said to me. In the end it feeds in to the feeling of worthlessness and makes the struggle against my self destructive thoughts pointless. I can express strong suicidal thoughts only for the professionals to walk out on me or discharge me following an assessment and yet the next minute they are calling the police to do a welfare check. I know it is a tightrope that they walk in taking \'positive risks\' - how I hate that phrase - but when you are asking for help, recognizing that you are losing the battle against the thoughts \'we can\'t really stop you\' is not what you want to hear. Ultimately it acts as a deterrent to making that call to ask for help because after all what can they really do - I just end up spirally downwards even quicker. To hear that phrase invokes the \'no one really cares - go with the thoughts\' and put an end to the pain. An insightful and thought provoking blog – complementing what we saw in Bedlam last week. Bedlam showed very well the day to day reality of being on an acute psych ward – in my own experience a less than therapeutic environment.

\”And ultimately, what I always say is, if you really want to kill yourself, you will kill yourself”. There’s no doubt that Dr Baggaley would not take a decision to discharge a patient lightly and that the decision-making process itself, is not straightforward, but I can’t help but consider the apparent contradiction of the statement.

I don\’t know how many times I have had the \’if you really want to kill yourself ..\’ statement said to me. Yes it does contradict everything that goes behind the so called duty of care. I see other patients sectioned for their own safety and yet this is said to me. In the end it feeds in to the feeling of worthlessness and makes the struggle against my self destructive thoughts pointless. I can express strong suicidal thoughts only for the professionals to walk out on me or discharge me following an assessment and yet the next minute they are calling the police to do a welfare check. I know it is a tightrope that they walk in taking \’positive risks\’ – how I hate that phrase – but when you are asking for help, recognizing that you are losing the battle against the thoughts \’we can\’t really stop you\’ is not what you want to hear. Ultimately it acts as a deterrent to making that call to ask for help because after all what can they really do – I just end up spirally downwards even quicker. To hear that phrase invokes the \’no one really cares – go with the thoughts\’ and put an end to the pain.

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Comment on Why do antidepressants take so long to work? by Dana http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2012/03/why-do-antidepressants-take-so-long-to-work/#comment-934 Dana Wed, 23 Oct 2013 06:15:02 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=66#comment-934 I'd be curious to see some references for the notion that SSRIs actually upregulate receptors. The more commonsensical explanation for why they take so long to work seems, on my view, to be the following: because the drugs have considerable half-lives, it takes some time for adequate amounts to build up in one's system. I’d be curious to see some references for the notion that SSRIs actually upregulate receptors. The more commonsensical explanation for why they take so long to work seems, on my view, to be the following: because the drugs have considerable half-lives, it takes some time for adequate amounts to build up in one’s system.

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Comment on Why do antidepressants take so long to work? by gavin http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/2012/03/why-do-antidepressants-take-so-long-to-work/#comment-921 gavin Fri, 13 Sep 2013 20:49:36 +0000 http://www.oxfordmhf.org.uk/blog/?p=66#comment-921 This is a great article. Very informative and such a helpful explanation of how antidepressants work. This is a great article. Very informative and such a helpful explanation of how antidepressants work.

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